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Soy sauce / History & etc. / Japanese Cuisine

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Soy sauce (also called soya sauce) is a condiment produced by fermenting soybeans with Aspergillus oryzae or Aspergillus soyae molds, along with water and salt. After the fermentation, which yields moromi, the moromi is pressed, and two substances are obtained: a liquid, which is the soy sauce, and a cake of (wheat and) soy residue, the latter being usually reused as animal feed.
http://viviangrant.files.wordpress.com/2010/07/soy-sauce-sq-bowl.jpg

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/06/05/phaidon/image/7_567-table-type-soy-sauce-.jpg
(Soy sauce / Image)

Most commonly, a grain is used together with the soybeans in the fermentation process, but not always. Also, some varieties use roasted grain. Soy sauce is a traditional ingredient in East and Southeast Asian cuisines, where it is used in cooking and as a condiment. In more recent times, it is also being used in Western cuisine and prepared foods.

All varieties of soy sauce are salty, earthy, brownish liquids intended to season food while cooking or at the table. Soy sauce has a distinct basic taste called umami (旨味, literally "delicious taste") in Japanese.

How to Make Soy Sauce and Miso at Home

History

Soy sauce originated in China 2,500 years ago and its use later spread to East and Southeast Asia.[5] Like many salty condiments, soy sauce was probably originally a way to stretch salt, historically an expensive commodity. The recipe for Chinese soy sauce, 酱油 jiàngyóu, originally included fermented fish as well as soybeans.

Soy sauce has a distinct basic taste called umami (旨味, literally "delicious taste") in Japanese, due to naturally occurring free glutamates. Umami was identified as a basic taste in 1908 by Kikunae Ikeda of the Tokyo Imperial University.

Records of the Dutch East India Company list soy sauce as a commodity in 1737, when seventy-five large barrels were shipped from Dejima, Japan, to Batavia (present-day Jakarta) on the island of Java. Thirty-five barrels from that shipment were then shipped to the Netherlands.

In the 18th century, Isaac Titsingh published accounts of brewing soy sauce, known as shōyu in Japan. Although earlier descriptions of soy sauce had been disseminated in the West, this was among the earliest to focus specifically on the brewing of the Japanese version.

By the mid-19th century, the more expensive Japanese shōyu gradually disappeared from the European market, and "soy sauce" became synonymous with the Chinese product. Europeans were unable to make soy sauce because they did not understand the function of kōji, the fungus used in its brewing.

By JS on Mar 21, 2011
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上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。