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Sake Drinkers' Food (2) / Japanese Food

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Certain foods are strongly associated with drinking and are often known as otsumami. This is an honorific formed from the verb tsumamu, to pick something up by the fingertips (or chopsticks).
Another expression for food specifically intended as an accompaniment to sake is sakana. Below are a few of the bits and pieces to be found at the elbow of drinkers in Japan - sakana every sake fan should try at least once.
Shiokara: Salt-Pickled Thingummies

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/192/454923505_3704eebd59.jpg
(Shiokara / Image)

Fish, shellfish, and various bits of their insides are the most common ingredients. The various salty bits and pieces come in a range of slime-creature colors and textures. The most common version is the pinkish one made from squid, called ika no shiokara.
One of the foods traditionally loathed by Western visitors, these delicacies are certainly an acquired taste. I have been told that it is the amino acids, which accumulate in the curing process, that make them go so well with sake.

Tsukemono: Japanese Pickles

http://www.y-douro-k.or.jp/nishizaou/tsukemono.jpg
(Taukemono / Image)

A wide variety of ingredients are pickled in a number of bases - salt, rice bran (nuka), soy sauce, vinegar, miso, koji, and the caked lees (kasu) left over when sake is pressed.
The length of time varies from a few hours for ichiyazuke (one-night pickles), to a few months for vegetables done in salt and rice bran (takuan, made from the daikon radish, is the most popular), and several years for the famous Nara speciality of vegetables (primarily shirorui, a relative of the melon) pickled in sake lees.

http://www.foodfashionista.com/.a/6a00e553e71852883301156ef56c81970c-500pi
(Taukemono / Image)

With such a range of flavors - from the light touch of ichiyazuke, to the vinegary tang of purple Kyoto shibazuke and the rich years' worth of taste in a slice of narazuke - it is easy to find the perfect companion for the lightest of ginjo or the funkiest of koshu.

By J.S. on May 23, 2010
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tag : Sake Drinkers' Food / Japanese

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上記広告は1ヶ月以上更新のないブログに表示されています。新しい記事を書くことで広告を消せます。